Monday, 30 November 2015

Sex-Ed in The Barnyard

On the farm kids grow up witnessing animals going about their business in just about every conceivable way. So much so, in fact, that we usually didn't pay much attention to, say, a bull breeding a cow right before our eyes. But when we hired a ram to service our 4 ewes I knew that there would be questions. My kids have not been around the cattle as much and this summer when I started talking about having baby lambs my 5 year old (J) asked " but mommy how does the baby get in her tummy?". A question I sort of dreaded, to which I replied "well the daddy just kind of jumps on her" SIGH. Not my best work but as much as I'd rehearsed for that moment I still drew a blank. "That's horrifinding!" (My son's description of everything unfavourable). Not much more has been said on the subject, that is, until today. 

Enter Prince Charming. 


When our ram arrived (kindly delivered by my brother from the neighbour's), the 3 year old (O) had fallen asleep on my sewing room floor so J and I quickly hustled out to meet our new guest. It took only a minute to turn him in with the ewes and my brother left--by now I can hear that O is awake and wants to come out. I left for two minutes, three tops, only to return to a crying child and one quite thoroughly bred sheep. 

In hindsight, I might have known the courtship may go quickly, but it didn't occur to me that it would happen while I walked to the house. And I hadn't bargained on it upsetting my boy so much. My poor little soft-hearted goose worried that his ewe that he bottle fed with his gramma was being "bullied and stomped by that big mean ram". It was at once the most hilarious and tender moment with my child. Am I a beast for wanting to roll around laughing at the awkwardness of the situation? Likely, and I apologize for it I don't mean to be offensive. At the same time I felt a lump in my throat for his simple love for his animals. A farmer's love. He wants to see them cared for and never come to harm, and I was extremely proud. I tried to be matter of fact in stating that it doesn't hurt her or she would walk away from the ram, and it's the way that we get our baby lambs in spring. I had an eloquent speech up my sleeve about how all things are born from a seed....I'm sure I would have messed it up....but thank goodness he seemed content to know that it's not hurting her and that the ram will not be staying long. Seriously, I am hoping that these barnyard scenes become less traumatic for us both! Now that's country living :)

4 comments:

  1. Oh my! I wouldn't have expected it to happen that quickly especially since it isn't even your ram. I mean the least he could have done was a couple of minutes of foreplay ;-)

    Your son is so very sweet. Far, far better for him to care (a lot) at that age than to immediately think nothing of it.

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    1. He's a soft-hearted kid. It's going to be so fun to have the baby lambs around :) thanks for commenting Pru!

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  2. When our youngest daughter was in elementary school we often had conversations that started with "Don't go to school and tell everyone that _______." That the cow was cranky because she was in heat. That the goat had feet sticking out of her butt. That the buck/bull/rooster ______. It's never dull on the homestead, is it!

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    1. LOL!! It is never dull....I feared that the topic might come up at school but it mustn't have. But these things like to pop up at the least opportune moment...Christmas dinner, the check out at the grocery store, anywhere awkward, really! Thanks for reading!

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